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Rules

Rules in short

Rules forum for TC. All discussions regarding rules and questions should be asked here.

by Theo » 05 Sep 2016, 19:07

Hi all,
following the questions on our Kickstarter page here goes a short summary of the game rules. NOTE: This is all subject to change though the KS books will be updated. However, in general this is how it is structured.

Dices
Three types of dice are used in the game: six-sided, 10-sided, and 20-sided. Sometimes you can see the abbreviation “OR” after 1D10, which stands for "open roll." This means there is a chance that you might roll high enough to get to roll the die again and then add the rolls. Because of this, rolls with open roll opportunities may grow much larger than the usual range of those dice. Open rolls are mainly used for damage; a small weapon have OR on 10, medium on 9-10 and heavy 8-10. Big monsters may have a wider span.

Character Traits
Perhaps the most important aspects of a character are its character traits. For example, the traits might distinguish him/her as having the “strength of a troll” or “godlike charisma”. Different character traits will result in different modifications as well, primarily of skills, but also for other important aspects within the game.

There are positive as well as negative character traits, so a character has two directions they can emphasize character traits – positive or negative. Character traits are: Charisma, Constitution, Dexterity, Intelligence, Perception, Strength and Psyche. In the last printed version all characters choose two positive and one negative traits and then roll. This may change in the updated version, but the basics will not.

Races and Archetypes
Players can choose from the following playable races: Human, elf, dwarf, half-troll but is open to change in the revised version. Playable archetypes are: Pries, village dweller, scholar, warrior, rouge, bard, ranger, wizard.

Skills
Characters measure how capable they are in various proficiencies and talents by acquiring Skills. There are nine general Skills. As a complement to the general Skills, there are Disciplines and Specialties. Disciplines are ways for you to improve your character in a particular area of a general skill, while specialties focus even deeper as ways for you to specialize in a particular aspect of those disciplines already acquired. By obtaining disciplines and specialties a character can go beyond 10 skill value (the limit allowed through general skill increases alone).

General skills are quite generic and at least one of them can apply to almost any situation. How good you are at a skill is measured on a scale from 0-10, which is referred to as skill value. Every skill also has five levels it can earn per discipline and specialty, which can raise that skill value further in certain situations. Disciplines usually raise the skill value by +1 per level, and specialties usually raise the skill value by +2 per level.
To earn levels of a discipline or specialty, however, the character must reach a certain skill value in the general skill first. And one can only begin learning a specialty after he/she has first acquired at least one level in the discipline that specialty belongs to. A character learns general skills first, then can earn disciplines within that skill, and finally specialties within those disciplines; in that order.
Skill rolls are tested with the 1D20. If the roll is equal to or lower than the skill value (after any situational modifications to that value) you have succeeded with the skill check, but if the roll is higher you have failed.

Because you want to roll low on skill rolls, any modifications that make a situation more or less likely are applied to the skill value (not the roll). Negative modifications make the number harder to roll below, while positive modifications make the task easier.

Body points
To determine how much damage a character can take, body points are used. The more body points a character has, the more damage the character can endure before he/she dies.

When characters are hit by a weapon or anything else that causes damage, they will receive a number of damage points that are subtracted from their current body points.

Action Round
In battles you roll for initiative to determine who will start. The one who wins the initiative decides what he/she wants to do first, and when. Some specialties can be used to achieve a better initiative.

Initiatives are rolled with the 1D10 (OR 10) ± modifications. The higher the roll, the sooner one acts in the round.

Combat Capacity and Combat points
All characters and creatures have a certain degree of efficiency when in combat that is referred to as combat capacity, which is measured in combat points. The character uses his/her combat points to perform different actions in a combat round such as attacking, parrying, or several other things that might affect the current battle. The number of combat points a character has is equal to the skill value of the Fighting skill, but can also be raised with the help of certain disciplines and specialties. The combat capacity is completely dynamic, which means that a player can decide from one instance to another how many combat points he/she wants to use when attacking or parrying. The same rules apply to the people and creatures that the game master plays.

Vitner capacity and Vitner points
Magic and enchantments are a very present reality in Trudvang. To be able to use magic the character has to have the Vitner Craft skill, and how efficient the character is with magic is largely based on the skill level he/she possesses. Characters with the Vitner Craft skill as well as the Call of Vitner discipline have the ability to attract Vitner. This is what grants a character what is referred to as vitner capacity, which is measured in vitner points. The character uses his/her vitner points to conjure incantations. The number of vitner points a character has (their vitner capacity) is equal to the skill value of the Vitner Craft skill, which can be raised further with the help of disciplines and specialties.

Holy capacity and holy points
In this game world not only is magic a reality, but so are divine feats. To use divine abilities your character needs the Faith skill, as well as the right discipline and specialty that gives him/her access to specific divine abilities. Characters with the Faith skill and the Divine Power discipline have achieved the ability to call on the powers of the gods. This is what grants a character what is referred to as holy capacity and is measured in divinity points. The character uses his/her divinity points to activate divine abilities. The number of divinity points a character has (their holy capacity) is equal to the skill value of the Faith skill, which can be raised further with the help of disciplines and specialties.
Dwarves who get this discipline receive just as many divinity points as others get, but the points are linked to one or more specific objects instead, and get used by transferring them from the diviner into that object.
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by Lobst5r » 05 Sep 2016, 19:47

Thanks for the overview! I'm going to share this post with some people and see if they're interested in backing the project. I do have questions about combat:

When you are attacking an opponent, you spend X number of points to perform = X number of actions, am I understanding that correctly? So inversely, if you are attacked a player would do the same with any remaining CP?

How do players manage CP? Do CP start at max combat capacity at the beginning of the round, are spent, then are regained at the beginning of the next round?

Thank you
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by Theo » 05 Sep 2016, 19:55

Hi L,
Yes, X number of actions or even better, decide how much you want to spend on one attack. Say just for the sake that you have 30 CP.. You can divide them into 3 attacks on 10 , or 2 attacks on 10 and one parry. Or 2 attacks at 15 etc.. That's the easiest one.. say you want to move and attack, then you have to spend X before you attack etc.. Yes always start with new points every round.

Cheers
Theo
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by Chaosmeister » 12 Sep 2016, 11:16

First, thank you for this post, but I must admit I am a bit confused. On the KS you Quote BRP as a base, but BRP is percentage based. Are you not referring to this one? http://www.chaosium.com/basic-roleplaying/

A more specific question regarding this part.

Character traits are: Charisma, Constitution, Dexterity, Intelligence, Perception, Strength and Psyche. In the last printed version all characters choose two positive and one negative traits and then roll. This may change in the updated version, but the basics will not.


Can you maybe give a more detailed example? I don´t get how this should work considering your previous example rate traits as "Strength of a Troll" without a number attached to it. I was also under the impression the game is skill based, when would I roll traits? And How? Also D20 low or differently?

Thanks!
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by Magnus » 14 Sep 2016, 18:06

Hope this will help you :)

First the description of character traits,
then one sample of character traits and last situation rolls
(how to use the traits if no skill is used)

Character Traits

Perhaps the most important aspects of a character are its character traits. For example, the traits might distinguish him/her as having the strength of a troll or godlike charisma. Different character traits will result in different modifications as well, primarily of skills, but also for other important aspects within the game. There are positive as well as negative character traits, so character have two directions they can emphasize character traits - good or bad.

All of the other denizens in the world, the ones who are controlled by the game master, also have character traits and skills of their own. Some creatures also have unique abilities that they can use (e.g. dragons can breathe fire, ghosts can become invisible, etc.).

Strength

Strength describes a character's raw power, physical stamina and endurance. A person with high value of this trait is big, strong and durable, and in good physical condition.

Strength – Positive

Strength +4

The character is as powerful as a grown troll and most agree that there must be troll blood running in his veins.

Situation modification: +4
Damage modification: +4 in damage (added after open rolls have been rolled)
Body points: +4

Strength +2

The character is almost as powerful as a troll. For some reason her strength has developed more than normal and the character is well known for her incredible might.

Situation modification: +2
Damage modification: +2 in damage (added after open rolls have been rolled)
Body points: +2

Strength +1

The character is strong, stronger than most others.

Situation modification: +1
Damage modification: +1 in damage (added after open rolls have been rolled)
Body points: +1

Strength - Negative

Strength -1

Physical prowess has never been the character's most prominent character trait. The character is weak and finds most things that involve muscle difficult.

Situation modification: -1
Damage modification: -1 in damage (but never lower than 1 and is subtracted after open rolls have been rolled)
Body points: -1

Strength -2

At some point during the character’s childhood the muscles stopped developing. He is quite feeble and appears frail and thin.

Situation modification: -2
Damage modification: -2 in damage (but never below 1 and is subtracted after open rolls are rolled)
Body points: -2
Other: Cannot use heavy one-handed weapons.

Strength -4

The character is anything but strong. To lift even the smallest object feels burdensome and unmanageable. Most agree that the character belongs to the weakest sort of humans.

Situation modification: -4
Damage modification: -4 in damage (but never below 1 and is subtracted after open rolls have been rolled)
Body points: -4
Other: Can only use light one-handed weapons


Situation Rolls

There are situations when you want to do something that you do not have a skill for, or that cannot be role-played. In this case the game master should let the player roll what is called a situation roll with the 1D20. When deciding a situation value, start from situation value 10 and add or subtract from that base value depending on how easy or difficult the situation is. Success with a situation roll is determined in the same manner as a skill roll: the results have to be equal to or below the situation value the game master designates. The character’s traits are often important for these rolls because the character traits can grant either positive or negative modifications as well.
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by BardicDave » 15 Sep 2016, 02:23

Hello, I am a backer for the kickstarter and I'm very excited for the game! Would you be able to answer a few questions to help me get a better feel for how the game works?

1) What stats do each of the 7 traits modify?
2) Could you list each of the 9 skills?
3) How precisely do traits and skills interact? Do traits ever modify skill rolls?
4) Can you provide a few examples of disciplines and specialties?
5) Other than the Strength trait, how are a character's body points determined?
6) How many body points does a new character typically have?
7) What is the maximum number of body points a character could typically achieve over the course of a campaign?
8) How many body points would a troll typically have? A frost giant? An ancient dragon?
9) When a magic weaver casts a spell, is there a chance of failure? Is casting magic risky?
10) I heard the game includes something similar to D&D 3E's feats. Is this true?
11) How do characters' skills improve?

Thanks so much for your answers! Good luck with the rest of the Kickstarter!
Last edited by BardicDave on 15 Sep 2016, 02:35, edited 2 times in total.
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by BardicDave » 15 Sep 2016, 02:28

A few more questions just came to me:

12) What does a character's profession determine?
13) Can a warrior learn magic or priestly powers? Can a magic weaver learn to use a sword well?
14) Can you list all the different professions?
15) How does a character's race affect its abilites? Do races give bonuses/penalties to skills and traits?
16) Do different human cultures affect a character's abilities in the same way as race?


Thanks!
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by Magnus » 15 Sep 2016, 08:12

OK. lets go...


1) What stats do each of the 7 traits modify?

The Effects of a Character Trait

The character traits always have a “situation modification” as well as one or more effects. The situation modification is used to modify the character's chance of succeeding with an everyday task, which doesn't require a specific skill to succeed. This modification is applied to the target number the character tries to roll equal to or below. Other effects give the character a direct bonus or a penalty (for example: on Body Points). If the character trait is average (0), there is no situation modification.

2) Could you list each of the 9 skills?


• Agillity
• Care
• Entertainment
• Faith
• Fighting
• Knowledge
• Shadow arts
• Vitner carft
• Wilderness


3) How precisely do traits and skills interact? Do traits ever modify skill rolls?


Disciplines and specialties under certain skills could cost less or more depending on which trait you got.

4) Can you provide a few examples of disciplines and specialties?

General skills are quite generic and at least one of them can apply to almost any situation. How good you are at a skill is measured on a scale from 0-10, which is referred to as skill value. Every skill also has five levels it can earn per discipline and specialty, which can raise that skill value further in certain situations. Disciplines usually raise the skill value by +1 per level, and specialties usually raise the skill value by +2 per level.


Agility (Skill)

The Agility skill is used in most cases when a person performs something with his or her body. It may be, for example, when a person is going to jump, climb, handwalk, balance, fall and land well on your feet, or jump away from a runaway horse.

In addition to these more obvious bodily movement maneuvers, the skill is used at a number of other physical situations such as when the character is to drive a wagon or sleigh, ride, canoe, or ski. And even then he or she is likely dressed in armor, which will affect the results.

In all areas, it is ultimately up to the game master to determine when a skill roll is needed or not, and what modifications the character receives in each situation.

Body Control (Discipline)

Level 1-5: SV +1/level
The Body Control discipline develops the character's ability to get the most of his or her body's agility, for example: to duck, climb, and landing softly on your feet after a fall from high heights. The skill can also be used to make flips in the air and at other acrobatic maneuvers.

Double Handed (specialty)

Level 1-5: SV +2/level
The character has improved his or her ability to fight even with the shield hand, left for a right-handed person or vice versa. By learning all levels of this specialty, and the discipline of Body Control the character becomes equally skilled at using both hands. (These modifiers offset the penalty of -15 for using the shield hand, and at the highest level negate it completely.)

Jestering (specialty)

Level 1-5: SV +2/level
The person has learned to deal with fire, juggling, and other jester tricks. The knowledge has enabled the person to learn how to puff fire out of his or her mouth, pull hands through flame, and juggle. At times when the game master requires a skill roll from a person using this sort of knowledge, the person can add +2 to their skill value per level in this ability.

Jumping, Climbing, and Balancing (specialty)

Level 1-5: SV +2/level
The person is adept at jumping in different environments and may add +2 to their skill value in the ability to jump. The person can leap up to 2 + 1m/level in length (max. 7m), jump up to 60 + 20cm/level in height (max. 1.60 m), and fall up to 3+0.5 m /level number of meters (up to 6m) without getting hurt, with a successful skill roll. A successful roll in Jumping for falls from a high altitude also reduces the damage dice one level (3D6 becomes 2D6, etc.)

When a person wants to leap farther, jump higher, or fall farther than the level permits, it is up to the game master to provide suitable modification on the skill roll.

The character is also good at Climbing and Balancing. A person who balances successfully is moving at about a third of their movement ability in normal and simple conditions. A person climbing moves at about a fifth of his or her movement ability in normal and simple climbing conditions.

Ultimately, the game master determines how far a character climbs or balances during an action round based on the prevailing conditions.

Swim (specialty)

Level 1-5: SV +2/level
The person has learned to swim (without this knowledge the person cannot swim) and may add +2 to their skill value per level in the ability to swim. The person can normally move +1m/level per action round in the water, and hold his or her breath underwater for 10 action rounds per specialty level (max. 50 action rounds – or 4 minutes and 10 seconds, since an action round is 5 seconds long). A character without this specialization can still hold his/her breath for 12 rounds if standing still, or 6 rounds if under water or moving.

Those who swim with armor on can do this with armor up to Weight 1/level in the specialty (at most Weight 5). One person can easily move up to three action rounds under water. For each additional action round, a skill dice is required with the cumulative modification -2. After six action rounds (three cumulative modifications) you therefore have -6 to succeed. In case of a failure, the person must rise to the surface for air. The movement speed is the same as when swimming.

Mounting (Discipline)

Level 1-5: SV +1/level
The Mounting discipline develops the character's ability to ride animals sitting up, and driving a chariot driven by four-footed animals.

Driving Wagon (specialty)

Level 1-5: SV +2/level
The Driving Wagon discipline develops the character's ability to drive a wagon coupled to one or more pulling animals. Skill rolls are normally done only during hunts or in difficult terrain or weather conditions.

Riding (specialty)

Level 1-5: SV +2/level
The person has learned to ride a horse and is able to do maneuvers on horseback. Because of this, the person gets +2 on their skill value per level in the specialty whenever they try to ride fast, get the horse to jump, or do other tricks.

The Riding specialty can also be used in conjunction with long rides, when battles are fought, or for complications in the wild.

The rider has also learned to fight on horseback (or other riding animals) and how to use half of the riding animal's movement ability as Combat Movement. Each battle round that a person wants to fight on horseback, the rider must pay 15 (-3/ specialty level) combat points. So at full specialty level, there is no extra cost for fighting on horseback.

And so on….

5) Other than the Strength trait, how are a character's body points determined?

All humans has 32 body points.
Then the traits Constitution and Strength could each give the character -4 up to +4 body points. In worst case -8 and at best +8.

6) How many body points does a new character typically have?

The Body Points a character has depending on which race he or she belongs to.
Human 32
Elf 30
….

7) What is the maximum number of body points a character could typically achieve over thecourse of a campaign?

The body points stays the same through the campaign unless something out of the ordinary happens.

8) How many body points would a troll typically have? A frost giant? An ancient dragon

Iron dragon 465 BP
Hrimtursir (frost giant) 232 BP
Grey troll 58 BP
Forrest troll 22 BP

9) When a magic weaver casts a spell, is there a chance of failure? Is casting magic risky?

YES!!!

Fatal Failure, Fatal Magic

If an enchanter fails disastrously to weave the spell (20 on a D20), the formed vitner will bounce back and harm the mage. Enchanters refer to this occurrence as fatal magic. It unfortunately means that the enchanter needs to roll a die on the table for fatal magic.

AND every time a magic weaver casts a spell something happens (exactly what is up to GM to decide):

Negations

One of the biggest reasons that mages are both feared and revered at the same time has to do with the erratic behavior of the vitner. Whenever a mage conjures a spell by weaving vitner, that vitner is pulled from somewhere else in the greater vicinity where there is now a noticeable lack of vitner, resulting in what is called a negation. Suddenly, unexplainable things start to happen – with no apparent reason - that can cause the environment and people within it to react in different ways. A negation of a spell acts much like an opposite or counterpoint to the spell that is being conjured nearby. If a mage, for example, wants to conjure heat in one place, the negation would be inexplicable cold in another place, and vice versa. If he/she wants to weave a protective and concealing layer around a being so that it becomes hard to detect, another being elsewhere suddenly becomes incredibly noticeable and much easier to detect - and so on.

A negation does not necessarily have to be negative for the one experiencing it. Many times this could be quite the contrary. In many cases, mages attempt to weave spells that have a negative effect on someone or something. A negation from such a spell would likely be perceived as incredibly positive – even miraculous.

Often these sporadic negations only last for a few moments and in small doses, because the negation of a spell mostly happens in several, separate places at the same time and to a much smaller degree. But it is not unknown for a negation to break out with the same great power and focus as the spell being conjured. It is completely up to the game master to decide how big or powerful a negation gets, as well as whether or not it afflicts the players' characters in any way. And the more frequently an enchanter weaves the vitner in short periods of time, the closer and more concentrated these negations will become.

Negations are also one of the reasons - besides the fear of fatal magic - that mages do not want to weave vitner unnecessarily.


10) I heard the game includes something similar to D&D 3E's feats. Is this true?

Perhaps the disciplines and specialties???

11) How do characters' skills improve?

A character gets new skill points by acquiring adventure points in each adventure he/she finishes. A single adventure point corresponds to a single skill point and can be used directly for improving a character's skill value.

12) What does a character's profession determine?

Every archetype has a core skill which is tied to the character when it is created. The character has 50 bonus creation points to spend on that core skills as well as its disciplines and specialties.

13) Can a warrior learn magic or priestly powers? Can a magic weaver learn to use a sword well?

When a character has begun to adventure, he or she can learn any skills provided that the person has skill points to spend.

14) Can you list all the different professions?

Archetype Core Skills
Bard Entertainment
Dweller Care
Rogue Shadow Arts
Ranger Wilderness
Scholar Knowledge
Priest Faith
Vitner Weaver Vitner Craft
Warrior Fighting

15) How does a character's race affect its abilites? Do races give bonuses/penalties to skills and traits?

No, (not more than which culture he/she knows and what language he/she are speaking.

16) Do different human cultures affect a character's abilities in the same way as race?

Same as 15.
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by BardicDave » 15 Sep 2016, 08:34

Thank you! These answers are extremely helpful.
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by Thorgarth » 23 Sep 2016, 17:31

Ire have all seen summaries and some examples of specific rules, more often just integral parts of mechanics like examples of skills and disciplines, but so far we have not seen how this various mechanics and rules are applied in the context of the game in any comprehensive way. How do they interact and how do they impact on other mechanics?

What I ask, and been asking in other forums and FB, is for someone who understands the system to give a comprehensive combat example, applying the most important rules and mechanics, over a 3 or 4 rounds of battle. Initiative, attacks and defense, armor, damage and what that the loss of points entails (does it affect and how the rest of combat), how magic works in the context of battle, etc.

Three to four rounds of combat can be a game changer for many people. I for one have many doubts about how the system delivers the mood and the atmosphere of the setting, and i´m not inclined to back the KS unless I have a bit more information regarding it´s implementation.

I reckon someone who knows the system well can easily come up with a very interesting and exciting example.
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